Raising the Medicare Eligibility Age is a Cut to Social Security Benefits

Raising the Medicare eligibility age from 65 to 67 is harmful to seniors aged 65-67, who would be vulnerable to out-of-pocket costs from private insurers due to their ineligibility, or who might face two years without health insurance altogether.  Among these seniors, those already receiving Social Security would be especially harmed, as higher costs would consume even more of their already modest benefits.  As the following fact sheet from Social Security Works shows, even those seniors with a history of middle class earnings would see a sharp reduction in their hard-earned Social Security benefits under an increase in the Medicare eligibility age.

Raising the Medicare Eligibility Age to 67 Would Consume Up to 45% of Social Security Check for Middle-Class Seniors